Evidence of First Stars Found in Distant Galaxy GN-z11

**Summary:** The James Webb Space Telescope has discovered evidence of the first generation of stars in the universe in the galaxy GN-z11. This groundbreaking discovery sheds light on how galaxies in the early universe were able to grow.


Summary: The James Webb Space Telescope has discovered evidence of the first generation of stars in the universe in the galaxy GN-z11. This groundbreaking discovery sheds light on how galaxies in the early universe were able to grow.

The James Webb Space Telescope has made a significant discovery in the galaxy GN-z11, shedding light on the existence of the first generation of stars in the universe. This distant galaxy, with a redshift of 10.6, provides a glimpse into the early stages of galaxy formation, just 430 million years after the Big Bang.

Discovery of Population III Stars and Supermassive Black Hole


Astronomers, led by Roberto Maiolino of the University of Cambridge, used the JWST's Near-Infrared Camera and Near-Infrared Spectrometer to study GN-z11. They uncovered evidence of Population III stars, the first stars to form in the universe, as well as a supermassive black hole consuming vast amounts of matter and growing rapidly.

Population III stars are hypothesized to have formed from pristine hydrogen and helium, containing no heavy elements. The detection of ionized helium near the edge of GN-z11 suggests the presence of these early stars, shedding light on their formation process.

The Reader's Guide

Implications for Galaxy Formation


The discovery of Population III stars and a supermassive black hole in GN-z11 challenges existing models of galaxy formation. The presence of these entities in the early universe suggests that galaxies like GN-z11 were more efficient at forming massive stars than modern galaxies.

The findings, published in Astronomy & Astrophysics and Nature, provide valuable insights into the early stages of galaxy evolution and the role of Population III stars in shaping the cosmos. The JWST's observations of GN-z11 have opened up new avenues for exploring the mysteries of the universe.

Originally posted on Space.com.

Fateh Muhammad

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